Flowers and Femininity

Flowers have long been connected with femininity. The ancient Greeks often wore flower crowns to honor goddesses. The god Apollo is often drawn wearing a crown of laurel branches as a token of his love and devotion to the goddess Daphne. Even today, flower crowns are often worn at weddings as a symbol of fertility and love. In Chinese culture it is traditional for the bride to wear an orange blossom crown during the wedding to ceremony to help encourage fertility in the marriage, as an orange blossom tree produces both flowers and fruit at the same time.

Apollo and Daphne by Antonio Del Pollaiuolo

Apollo and Daphne by Antonio Del Pollaiuolo

 
Orange Blossom Print by Shealeen Louise

Orange Blossom Print by Shealeen Louise

In art, painters frequently used flowers to convey part of the female anatomy and there has been a long and deep connection with flowers and the female reproductive cycle, as both represent new life. One artist than always comes to our minds when we think about flowers representing a woman’s genitalia in art is Georgia O’Keffe. The American painter’s large scale study of flowers have strong symbolic links with the female anatomy. Flowers are also used to represent certain phases in a woman’s life in art, in medieval paintings white flowers represented purity and virginity, blue flowers symbolised maternal loss. While in literature, flowers have often been used to convey the beauty of a woman, as well as the daily struggles of what it means to be a woman. Celebrate all the strong women in your life with beautiful flowers, both represent beauty, strength and purity.

“Like a wild flower; she spent her days, allowing herself to grow,

not many knew of her struggle, but eventually all; knew of her light.”

- Nikki Rowe

White Flower, 1929 by Georgia O'Keeffe

White Flower, 1929 by Georgia O'Keeffe

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